The spectacular Peacock Butterfly is a familiar sight in gardens in the UK and is unmistakable, with quite spectacular eyes on the upperside of the hindwings that give the Peacock butterfly its name. These eyes must appear very threatening to predators, such as mice, when confronting it head-on.

Peacock Butterfly‘ (Image by CRUSH Photography)

The underside is a different matter altogether, being almost black, providing perfect camouflage when the Peacock Butterfly is at rest on a tree trunk, or when hibernating.

Peacock Butterfly‘ (Image by CRUSH Photography)

In addition to camouflage and large eyes, it is able to make a hissing sound by rubbing its wings together that is audible to human ears. All in all, it must appear very threatening to any predator that might come across it. This is a highly mobile insect and occurs throughout the British Isles, although it is not found in parts of northern Scotland. However, its range does seem to be increasing, with sightings from new areas being recorded every year.

CRUSH Photography© 

Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2019 CRUSH Photography©
Acknowledgements: Extract taken from "UK Butterflies"

Hits: 48

Share:
Reading time: 1 min

A large and strong-flying butterfly and common in gardens. This familiar and distinctive insect may be found anywhere in Britain and Ireland and in all habitat types.

‘Red Admiral’

Starting each spring and continuing through the summer there are northward migrations, which are variable in extent and timing, from North Africa and continental Europe. The immigrant females lay eggs and consequently there is an emergence of fresh butterflies, from about July onwards. They continue flying into October or November and are typically seen nectaring on garden buddleias or flowering Ivy and on rotting fruit.

There is an indication that numbers have increased in recent years and that overwintering has occurred in the far south of England.

CRUSH Photography© 

Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2019 CRUSH Photography©
Acknowledgements: Extract taken from 'Butterfly Conser more...

Hits: 39

Share:
Reading time: 1 min

One of our most treasured songbirds, the Spotted Flycatcher, is disappearing. Once considered a common garden nesting species, the Spotted Flycatcher is now a bird that many people are willing to travel a long way to see.

‘Spotted Flycatcher’

Breeding Bird Survey data show a decline in the breeding population of 39% between 1995 and 2016, part of a staggering longer term decline of 87% since 1970.

The results of the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO) initial research indicate that more Spotted Flycatchers are dying during the first year of their lives and that this increased mortality is likely to be behind the population decline.

Funds raised through this appeal will enable BTO scientists to use a combination of the latest tracking devices and the support of local volunteers to follow individual birds as they migrate away from their breeding sites. This will help us to identify their wintering grounds and the areas that the birds use as stop-over sites en route.

CRUSH Photography©

Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2019 CRUSH Photography©
Acknowledgements: Extracts taken from the British Trust more...

Hits: 63

Share:
Reading time: 1 min
Page 3 of 36« First...2345102030...Last »
All original content on these pages is fingerprinted and certified by Digiprove