Fox Cub

The Red Fox ……..

The familiar fox that is most common in legend and lore is the red fox, but there are over 30 species of fox living in an amazing variety of environments all over the world. In general, foxes are small members of the dog family, the largest of which is the typical red fox.

Most other species are considerably smaller.

The red fox is the most wide-spread carnivore in the world, living in every region of the Northern Hemisphere including Central America, and having been introduced by humans to Australia, where they are so successful they are considered a major pest.

Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2018-2021 CRUSH Photography©
Acknowledgements: Extracts taken from: "Animal Facts En more...

Hits: 127

Share:
Reading time: 1 min
Purple Anemone

Anemone are perennials that have basal leaves with long leaf-stems that can be upright or prostrate. Leaves are simple or compound with lobed, parted, or undivided leaf blades. The leaf margins are toothed or entire.

Flowers with 4–27 sepals are produced singly, in cymes of 2–9 flowers, or in umbels, above a cluster of leaf- or sepal-like bracts. Sepals may be any color. The pistils have one ovule. The flowers have nectaries, but petals are missing in the majority of species.

The fruits are ovoid to obovoid shaped achenes that are collected together in a tight cluster, ending variously lengthened stalks; though many species have sessile clusters terminating the stems. The achenes are beaked and some species have feathery hairs attached to them.

Anemone are called “wind flowers.” Anemone is derived from the Greek word anemoi, which in English means “winds” .

Hits: 53

Share:
Reading time: 1 min

One of our most treasured songbirds, the Spotted Flycatcher, is disappearing. Once considered a common garden nesting species, the Spotted Flycatcher is now a bird that many people are willing to travel a long way to see.

‘Spotted Flycatcher’

Breeding Bird Survey data show a decline in the breeding population of 39% between 1995 and 2016, part of a staggering longer term decline of 87% since 1970.

The results of the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO) initial research indicate that more Spotted Flycatchers are dying during the first year of their lives and that this increased mortality is likely to be behind the population decline.

Funds raised through this appeal will enable BTO scientists to use a combination of the latest tracking devices and the support of local volunteers to follow individual birds as they migrate away from their breeding sites. This will help us to identify their wintering grounds and the areas that the birds use as stop-over sites en route.

CRUSH Photography©

Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2019 CRUSH Photography©
Acknowledgements: Extracts taken from the British Trust more...

Hits: 69

Share:
Reading time: 1 min
Page 1 of 17123410...Last »