The house sparrow is an opportunistic bird of towns and cities, parks, gardens and farmland. House sparrows feed on a variety of foods, including buds, grains, nuts and scraps, and will visit birdtables and feeders. They live in colonies and nest in holes or crevices in buildings, among Ivy or other bushes, and in nestboxes; they use a variety of materials to make their nests.

Both parents will incubate the three to five eggs and raise the young. House sparrows are residents in the UK, but may disperse from their breeding grounds to feed on nearby farmland and grassland in winter.

Male house sparrows are streaky brown above and grey below. They have chestnut wings with white wingbars, a black bib and a grey cap. Females and juveniles are a drab brown. Tree sparrows look similar to male house sparrows, but have a brown crown and a black spot on each cheek.

Images by CRUSH Photography©

Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2021 CRUSH Photography©
Acknowledgements: Extract taken from Wildlife Trusts.

Hits: 31

Share:
Reading time: 1 min

In moves that endanger Waders, a bird that has benefited from climate change will soon be decimated, an expert warns.

The Iceland-based black-tailed Godwit – a wading bird that winters in Britain – has enjoyed a 10-fold population increase compared with 120 years ago. But British expert Graham Appleton said Iceland is planting forests to offset carbon emissions, which in turn will damage the nesting habitats of Waders such as Godwits.

It is also planning wind-farms which can occupy nesting areas. Writing in the journal “Perspective” Mr Appleton said: “It seems like the land-use pattern of the last 1,000 years, which have been largely favourable for Waders, are now in reverse.

This is an interesting article published in the Daily Express Newspaper on Monday, the 09 August – always worthwhile looking at the big picture before jumping to conclusions about Climate Change in particular.

All images in this blog are taken by CRUSH Photography©

Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2021 CRUSH Photography©
Acknowledgements: Extracts taken from the Newspaper - T more...

Hits: 27

Share:
Reading time: 1 min

Key information

The twittering, wheezing song and flash of yellow and green as it flies, makes this finch a truly colourful character. Nesting in a garden conifer, or feasting on black sunflower seeds, it is a regular garden visitor, able to take advantage of food in rural and urban gardens. Although quite sociable, the Greenfinch may squabble among themselves or with other birds at the bird table.

Greenfinch populations declined during the late 1970s and early 1980s, but increased dramatically during the 1990s. A recent decline in numbers has been linked to an outbreak of trichomonosis, a parasite-induced disease which prevents the birds from feeding properly.

What they eat:

Seeds and insects.

Measurements:

Length: 15cm Wingspan: 26cm Weight: 28g

Images by CRUSH Photography©

Hits: 19

Share:
Reading time: 1 min

Want to make the most of your outdoor space but don’t know where to start? Here’s the RSPB’s ten easy ways to help turn your space into a brilliant place to relax and enjoy that will also help wildlife too! And the best bit is you don’t have to do all ten to make a big difference.

Images by CRUSH Photography©

Follow this link written by the RSPB to find out more.

Hits: 24

Share:
Reading time: 1 min
Page 1 of 212