How to Meditate in Nature

Meditation in Nature is done outside in natural surroundings. They help to enliven the basic intelligence of nature in our awareness and physiology. Our being resonates with the sight of a flower, sound of birds, feeling of the breeze. These experiences wake something up inside of us, and help to set our lives into a more natural rhythm. Nature lovers have discovered this secret without ever studying meditation in nature!

In nature meditations, we focus our awareness on the experience of nature — sight, sound, touch, smell (and perhaps even taste). As with every meditation, when the mind wanders from the focus of the meditation, bring it gently back. There are several different ways that this meditation can be done. Experiment and find what works best for you.

Images by CRUSH Photography©

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Acknowledgements: Extracts taken from Meditation Oasis

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The Speckled Wood butterfly occurs in woodland, gardens and hedgerows. Butterflies often perch in sunny spots, spiralling into the air to chase each other.

The aptly named Speckled Wood flies in partially shaded woodland with dappled sunlight. The male usually perches in a small pool of sunlight, from where it rises rapidly to intercept any intruder. Both sexes feed on honeydew in the tree tops and are rarely seen feeding on flowers, except early and late in the year when aphid activity is low.

The range of this butterfly contracted during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, but has spread back since the 1920s. It has continued to spread over the past two decades, recolonizing many areas in eastern and northern England and Scotland.

All Images by CRUSH Photography©

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Acknowledgements: Extract taken from: butterfly-conserv more...

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After a 21-year study, an international team of researchers has presented strong evidence to suggest the Painted Lady butterflies — previously suspected to cross the Sahara desert and oceans to reach Europe — can definitely make the migratory journey of many thousands of miles.

Researchers from Spain, China, the United Kingdom and the Netherlands found not only that Painted Lady butterflies make the trip, but that they do so in greater numbers when wetter conditions in the desert help grow the plants they lay eggs on. The findings increase our understanding of how insects, including pollinators and disease-carrying pests, could spread between continents in the future amid climate change.

“It demonstrates how the wildlife we see in the UK can transcend national boundaries, and protecting such species requires strong international cooperation,” said Tom Oliver, an ecologist at the University of Reading and co-author of a new study on the butterflies that appears in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

All Images by CRUSH Photography©

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Acknowledgements: Extract taken from c.net.com

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The spectacular Peacock Butterfly is a familiar sight in gardens in the UK and is unmistakable, with quite spectacular eyes on the upperside of the hindwings that give the Peacock butterfly its name. These eyes must appear very threatening to predators, such as mice, when confronting it head-on.

Peacock Butterfly‘ (Image by CRUSH Photography)

The underside is a different matter altogether, being almost black, providing perfect camouflage when the Peacock Butterfly is at rest on a tree trunk, or when hibernating.

Peacock Butterfly‘ (Image by CRUSH Photography)

In addition to camouflage and large eyes, it is able to make a hissing sound by rubbing its wings together that is audible to human ears. All in all, it must appear very threatening to any predator that might come across it. This is a highly mobile insect and occurs throughout the British Isles, although it is not found in parts of northern Scotland. However, its range does seem to be increasing, with sightings from new areas being recorded every year.

CRUSH Photography© 

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Acknowledgements: Extract taken from "UK Butterflies"

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