The colourful male bullfinch is unmistakable with his bright pinkish-red breast and cheeks. It has a grey back, black cap and tail, and bright white rump. The flash of the rump in flight and piping whistled call are usually the first signs of bullfinches being present. They feed voraciously on the buds of various trees in spring and were once a ‘pest’ of fruit crops.

The Bullfinch is a medium-sized to large finch, round in shape with a large, robust bill.

Both adult males and females have a black cap that extends forward around the bill, together with a grey back, black wings (with a grey-white wing bar), black tail and white rump.

The underparts of the colourful male bullfinch are rose-red, while those of the female and juveniles are pinkish-grey.

Juvenile Bullfinches have a brown head, lacking the black cap of the adults, but show similar wing, rump and tail markings.

The call note is a low, piping ‘deu-deu’ (sometimes ‘deu’), while the song is highly variable, though usually quiet in nature and audible only over short distances.

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Acknowledgements: Extracts taken from British Trust for more...

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A tiny brown bird, the Wren is dumpy, almost rounded, with a fine bill, quite long legs and toes, very short round wings and a short, narrow tail which is sometimes cocked up vertically. For such a small bird it has a remarkably loud voice.

The Wren is one of our most widespread breeding birds, found in all but some of the most remote and high-altitude parts of the UK. Despite its abundance – an estimate of 7.7 million breeding territories was made for the population in 2009 – this is a bird that is more often heard than seen.

Images by CRUSH Photography©

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The Common Kingfisher is a small unmistakable bright blue and orange bird of slow moving or still water. The Common Kingfisher flies rapidly, low over water, and hunt fish from riverside perches, occasionally hovering above the water’s surface. They are vulnerable to hard winters and habitat degradation through pollution or unsympathetic management of watercourses. Kingfishers are amber listed because of their unfavourable conservation status in Europe. They are also listed as a Schedule 1 species under the Wildlife and Countryside Act offering them additional protection. (Extract from RSPB)

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Coal Tit

The Coal Tit has a distinctive grey back, black cap, and white patch at the back of its neck.

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